Tag Archives: SLA

iBraryGuy’s DiGilio recognized for Career Achievement

DiGilioJohnAt the recent Special Libraries Association 2015 Annual Conference, iBraryGuy’s own John DiGilio was feted for his service. John was the recipient of the 2015 Thomson Reuters Award for Career Achievement. Presented by the Legal Division of SLA, the award is designed to recognize a member who has provided significant service to the SLA Legal Division. The award is generously sponsored by Thomson Reuters Westlaw. Continue reading

What’s in a Name: Does the GPO’s Name Change Impact Librarianship?

GPO

As of Wednesday, December 17th, the GPO is now the Government Publishing Office, a name change undertaken due to “the increasingly prominent role that GPO plays in providing access to Government information in digital formats”. Why did the GPO change their name and does this name change impact the library profession, which, similarly, has managed the transition from print to digital?

The key phrase from the GPO’s press release is “digital formats”: the standard format of information has changed, and so have the responsibilities of the GPO. This governmental agency now manages works born digitally, information disseminated electronically, and older works becoming digitized. As Davita Vance-Cooks, the Director of the Government Publishing Office states: “The name Government Publishing Office better reflects the services that GPO currently provides and will provide in the future.”

Upon the agency’s formation, in 1861, the dissemination of information required physical printing, the Printing of the GPO’s name referring to an actual printing press. Reading portions of 44 U.S. Code Chapter 3 – Government Printing Office, reveals various references to bookbinding, printing machinery, printing supplies, and other physical objects required, again, to physically print and distribute governmental information. Nowadays, the printing press has given way to the computer; the Printing in Government Printing Office did not properly reflect the agency’s workflow. And because digital publishing has largely trumped physical printing, the Government Printing Office name became a misnomer: the rebrand shows the GPO wanted to be seen as an agency that publishes, not an agency that prints.

From a perceptional standpoint, the librarian profession is linked to the physical library building. In reality, libraries are going digital, the physical spaces are becoming downsized and/or re-purposed, and librarians are managing these changes by developing skills suited for a new, digital world. The public opinion issue is when those outside the field assume a consequence of disappearing library buildings is disappearing librarians.

Though the economic crash of 2008 and subsequent downsizing certainly took their toll in the library (and every) industry, in its Occupational Outlook Handbook  United States Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 7% increase in library positions for the period from 2012 to 2022 (though it must be noted average growth is 11%).  We are looking at future predicted to have librarians, but perhaps not the physical libraries from where the profession takes its name.

The GPO’s response to a physical-to-digital transition was to rebrand itself with a name change—given its similar digital transition, is this something librarianship should explore? Does the profession need some type of macro re-branding? The issue has been explored before: recall the Special Libraries Association’s unsuccessful 2009 proposal to change its name to Strategic Knowledge Professionals (ASKPro). Why did that initiative fail, and what will be the ultimate consequences of the GPO name change? Are there other options to explore, like rebranding the actual concept of “the library” by promoting the concept of digital spaces? Again, our profession has responded well to a constantly changing digital world, but the question is how proactive do we have to be in letting the rest of the world know about it?

SLA Offers 2014 Contributed Papers

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Original scholarship is an often over-looked part of many annual conferences. It tends to get lost iin the chaotic shuffle between presentations, continuing education, time in the exhibit halls, and, of course, the need for social interaction with colleagues. It often seems that the heroes who work so hard on contributed papers end up having ther praises unsung. Luckily, the Special Libraries Association is belting out a tune of praise for its scholars from this year’s annual conference. Continue reading

iBraryguy Releases “60 Sites in 60 Minutes” List from SLA2014! Who made the cut?

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It was another big year for “60 Sites in 60 Minutes” at the 2014 Special Libraries Association Annual Conference & INFO-EXPO. Hosted by the Legal Division of SLA and generously sponsored by LexisNexis, the panel once again shared their top picks with a full house. From search sites to news, travel, and even a bit of irreverent fun, there was something for everyone! What sites made the cut? You can find out here. Continue reading

iBraryGuy Hits the Conference Circuit!

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year!  No, we are not referring to the end of the year holidays.  We are talking about library summer conference season, of course. That time of year when the business cards come out, the presentations go on, and the networking and educational opportunitiesget craaaaazy!  Hold onto your lanyards folks, because iBraryGuy is hitting the road with you. Continue reading

Academic, County, and Law Firm Librarians: Three Sides of the Same Coin

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Early on in Graduate School, I remember my Professional Adviser taking the time to sit me down and talk about the various career paths law librarians could embark on. Honestly, I was really only familiar with the law school’s library, using its vast, comfortable reading room as my command station to hammer out papers about information sources and using technologies to meet patron needs. Admittedly, I was confused and befuddled when my Adviser stated, beyond academic law librarians, there are also private law librarians and government law librarians. Prior to this, I had no idea law firms employed librarians—little did I know this was where the future me would thankfully find gainful employment. So, even as a future law firm librarian, I was certainly oblivious to the fact the law librarian profession is comprised of three large classes of professionals: academic, government, and private. Continue reading

On Firmer Ground Turns 2!

Add another candle to the cake! On Firmer Ground, the little law librarian blog that could, has turned two years old. Wow, has it grown!

Started in June 2011 by members of the Legal Division of the Special Libraries Association and the Private Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries, On Firmer Ground (OFG) quickly turned into a bit of a global juggernaut. Within weeks of its debut, the site had signed on editors from law library groups in Europe, Africa, and the Pacific. Currently, there are seven participating organizations churning out content designed to demonstrate that real value of law firm librarians. The full list is below.

When OFG launched at the end of June 2011, it did so with one post and 90 views. In the two years since, the blog has published almost 60 entries and racked up almost 81,000 visits! A mere two followers has turned into over 1000. That is no small feat for a team of seven very busy editors. OFG is run entirely by volunteers on a shoe-string budget. Their only compensation is te satisfaction of knowing that they are making a strong case for the future vitality and value of their profession.

So happy second birthday, On Firmer Ground! Keep those blog posts rolling!

OFG Participating organizations: the Legal Division of the Special Libraries Association, the Private Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries, the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (l’Association Canadienne des Bibliothèques de Droit), the British and Irish Association of Law Librarians, the Australian Law Librarians’ Association, the New Zealand Law Librarians’ Association, and the Organisation of South African Law Libraries.

Site: On Firmer Ground http://www.firmerground.com

An Interview with iBraryGuy, John DiGilio

iBraryGuy editor, John DiGilio, was recently interviewed for the SLA Legal Division Docket’s “Full Disclosure” feature.  You can get the whole lowdown here.

iBraryGuy talks Work-Life Balance for SLA Illinois!

Join the Illinois Chapter of SLA and @iBraryGuy for …

In the Balance: Tools to Increase Your Personal & Professional Productivity

Work, work, work… Most of us do it to live. Sadly, an increasing number of us also feel like it is all we live to do. But is it a sign of the times or more indicative of our own inability to effectively balance our work and our lives? Work is certainly a big part of our lives and we should enjoy and be good at what we do. But there is so much more to life than shifts, time clocks, bosses and pay checks. Separating our lives from our jobs is a form of art and one of the keys to real well-being.

Join iBraryGuy and librarian John DiGilio for an exploration of hot new tools that can make you more productive both personally and professionally. These are tools that can help you find your balance and increase your overall well-being and happiness. The same technology that makes you a superstar at the office can be used to make you shine at home. Come check out some cool sites and fun apps and strike your own balance for the better.

SLA Members: $15
Non Members: $25
Students and Unemployed Members: Compliments of SLA Illinois

Register here: August 28 Webinar Registration

iBraryGuy is this month’s SLA Legal Division “Profile in Law Librarianship”

We are humbled and honored that our own iBraryGuy founder and editor, John DiGilio, has been featured and interviewed as this month’s “Profile in Law Librarianship” by the Legal Division of the Special Libraries Association.  Working with the Legal Division has been a passion of ours for quite some time now and is a relationship we look forward to developing for years to come.  Thank you, Legal Division, for the feature and for giving law librarianship a voice!